Planning your tour: money and costs

Published on:  | Last updated: 15 April 2014

Cards and cash machines (ATMs)

Italy has a huge number of banks and even small villages will often have an ATM (Bancomat). But if you are going somewhere remote it's probably a good idea to have enough cash to last you a two or three days.

Credit and debit cards are widely accepted, but Italians don't use cards as much as people in some other European countries. That may be because of the card companies charges - certainly it's common to have a minimum limit for using the card. I mainly pay by cash for things like campsites, drinks, and meals and food.

Costs

My budget for travelling in Italy is 60 euros a day - mainly camping, but normally eating out and staying in the occasional hotel. If there's more than one of you, or you cook for yourselves then you could live for less than that.

Item Cost
coffee (espresso) 1€
latte macchiato €1.50
brioche (croissant) €1
beer (small) 2€
gelato 1.5 – 2€
campsite 15€ for 1 person
hostel 20€
hotel 50€ per room/​night
picnic lunch from a deli 5€
lunch in a bar or restaurant - menu fisso 12€
dinner (2 courses with quarter litre of house wine) 25€
dinner (pizza and a medium-sized beer) 15€
Notes
  • these prices are simply a guide
  • hotel prices quoted here are for decent-quality hotels. You could pay a lot more depending on your tastes and budget
  • hotels and campsites generally vary with the time of year and location. In summer 2013 the prices I paid at campsites varied from 8.5€ to 22.5€, hotels from 35€ to 62€.
  • my typical breakfast - a latte macchiato or two and a brioche or two - averaged €3.60 (Summer 2013)
  • campsites generally charge about 7 or 8 euros for the pitch and the same amount per person so if you are a couple the costs comes to say 11€ per person per night (prices vary depending on area and time of year)
  • hotels generally charge for the room - although generally there is a bit of a reduction for single room or a double room let for one person

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