North-West Italy

Published on:  | Last updated: 10 March 2017

  Overview map:  FT-map-NW-Italy-overviewshow map in overlay    |  FT-map-NW-Italy-overview  show map in new window 

National and international routes

The Villa Morosini on the north bank of the Po near Polesella (Veneto)

eurovelo 8 (Ciclovia del Po e delle Lagune)

The eurovelo 8 route crosses Italy with France at one end and Slovenija at the other. For much of the way it follows traffic-free cycleways along the river Po. There are also long traffic-free sections as it follows the Adriatic coast.

Read more: eurovelo 8

TA section of the Ciclovia  Francigena near San Quirico d'Orcia

eurovelo 5 (Ciclovia Francigena)

The Via Francigena is the tradi­tional pilgrimage route that runs from Canterbury in south-east England to Rome. Although eurovelo 5 is also called the Via Francigena Romea, for much of its way to Italy it's a completely different route. In Italy, the two meet up at Pavia on the river Po. There's also a Moncenisio variant to the Ciclovia Francigena which provides a useful route for cycle travellers coming from France and heading towards Rome.

Read more: Via Francigena and eurovelo 5 in Italy

Lakes

Lago d‘Iseo (Lombardia)

Lakes of Lombardia and Piemonte

This route is a great option if you’re looking for an accessible route that links the major Italian lakes. Based on the Laghi di Lombardia route prepared by the by the FIAB (Federazione Italiana Amici della Bicicletta), it’s partic­u­larly valuable in providing a link between the Lago di Como and the Lago di Garda –a densely-populated area where without local knowledge it would be easy to go wrong.

Read more: The Lakes of Lombardia and Piemonte

view of the Lago Maggiore

A tour of the Western Lakes

A 250-kilometre road tour that takes in five lakes. Three of the bigger lakes: Lago Maggiore, Lago di Lugano and and the Lago di Como, as well as two smaller lesser-known gems: the Lago d’Orta, Lago di Mergozzo. The route avoids the busier roads and there are sections of cycleway. There’s relat­ively little climbing, except for one classic climb to the chapel of the Madonna del Ghisallo - patron saint of cycling. This is a loop, so you could avoid it, but it would be a shame to miss the great views of the Lago di Como.

Read more: A tour of the Western Lakes

Get in touch

Please get in touch if you find any errors in the information, or if there’s anything, good or bad, that you’d want other cyclists to know.


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